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Oil on Canvas 18" w x 24" h

Oil on Canvas 18″ w x 24″ h Commissioned SOLD

 

Oil on canvas 36″ wide x 24″ tall

 

"CHARLESTON HORSE NUMBER ONE," 24" x 38" oil on canvas. SOLD . This was originally scheduled to be a poster for the Charleston tourism office in the management changed and they canceled the project the idea had been to paint a picture of various Charleston buggy horses do a series of posters featuring the hoof print of the horse the signature of the driver and the signature of the artist. It was my idea which I had pitched to the tourism office and they were all for it to start with and the person who agreed to do it loved the painting.

“CHARLESTON HORSE NUMBER ONE,” 24″ x 38″ oil on canvas. SOLD

 

27" x 17" watercolor and Gouache.

27″ x 17″ watercolor and Gouache.

 

"Charleston horse Number Two," 24 x 38" oil on canvas. SOLD. Although the poster project for Charleston was canceled I received a phone call for and plants that the famous interior designer from Atlanta Georgia she was in charge of the Rittenhouse which was a Southern living home at Clemson University and she wanted to display my Charleston buggy horse in the home the patron who it bought it felt like he could live without it for the period of time it would be on display so she asked about consider painting a second one and since it originally been scheduled to be a series that was not a problem. The second horse sold also. The publicity exposure from being one the artists in the Wren House, I had six pieces in there, was of course helpful.

“Charleston horse Number Two,” 24 x 38″ oil on canvas. SOLD.
Although the poster project for Charleston was canceled I received a phone call from Ann Platz, the famous interior designer from Atlanta, Georgia. Ann was the interior designer for the  “Wren”house which was a Southern living home at Clemson University. Ann wanted to display my Charleston buggy horse in the home but the patron who bought it felt like he could not live without it for the period of time it would be on display. So Ann asked if I would  consider painting a second one and since it originally had been scheduled to be a series that was not a problem. The second horse sold also. I had a total of six paintings in the Wren house. The exposure of my artwork being seen in magazines such as Southern Living and newspaper articles was very beneficial.

 

"Paddles," 18 x 24" acrylic on paper. Commissioned. Paddles was a very young dog just barely not a puppy anymore when the neighbor shot him with an arrow and left him to die in the yard when his owner told me the story and that she had only a couple of snapshots of a I agreed to do a painting based on his breed but with his color markings.

“Paddles,” 18 x 24″ acrylic on paper. Commissioned. SOLD
Paddles was a very young dog just barely not a puppy anymore when a neighbor shot him with an arrow and left him to die in the yard.When his owner told me the story and that she had only a couple of snapshots  I agreed to do a painting based on his breed but with his color markings.

 

"Peanut Rearing," 21" x 29" pencil heightened with gouache. SOLD. I often travel with paper taped on boards so that if I see a scene I can stop and sketch it on one such day I saw this white horse prancing in the field it would rear up and Paul the air and then prints around I got out and went up to sketch the animal and is accommodated me by rearing up whenever I'd rear my hands up the drawing was of course very loose to the point of wildness. When I took it back to the studio I decided to heighten the picture with gouache a technique that was very popular in the Renaissance.

“Peanut Rearing,” 21″ x 29″ pencil heightened with gouache. SOLD.
I often travel with paper taped on boards so that if I see a scene I can stop and sketch it. On one such day I saw this white horse prancing in the field it would rear up and paw the air and then prance  around. I got out to sketch the animal and it accommodated me by rearing up whenever I’d rear my hands up. The drawing was of course very loose to the point of wildness. When I took it back to the studio I decided to heighten the picture with gouache a technique that was very popular in the Renaissance.

 

"Jeannie's Dog," 14 x 21" gouache on acid-free paper. Sold. I was supposed to be painting Jeannie but wonder dog ran up under the table I stopped and did a painting of the dog and for some reason we never got around to finishing Jeannies painting.

“Jeannie’s Dog,” 14 x 21″ gouache on acid-free paper. Sold.

 

"Egret Head," 9" x 16" acrylic on paper. Sold. This Egret follow me around one year and allowed me to do sketches and photographs that a closeness that's not normally available with wildlife he gets so comfortable he would walk up and eat things that were practically touching my feet. That kind of closeness with a wild animal is rare and usually accomplished with a great deal of stillness on the part of the human.

“Egret Head,” 9″ x 16″ acrylic on paper. Sold.
This Egret followed me around one year and allowed me to do sketches and photographs closer than wildlife would normally allow. He got so comfortable he would walk up and eat things that were practically touching my feet. That kind of closeness with a wild animal is rare and is usually accomplished with a great deal of stillness on the part of the human.

 

"Egret Eating a Shrimp," 24" x 30" oil on canvas. Available This was a painting of the same Egret lab made it so close and do any ahead study I have been told by another wildlife artist that I should've painted to meeting a shrimp because that's not their natural diet it is however my experience that animals will eat just about anything that they can get their teeth on one or begin this case including I have witnessed deer eating meat after a force fire and I've watched cows eat 10 cans and scrap metal of various kinds.

“Egret Eating a Shrimp,” 24″ x 30″ oil on canvas. 
This was a painting of the same Egret from the study above. I have been told by another wildlife artist that I should not have painted an Egret eating a shrimp because that’s not their natural diet. It is my experience that animals will eat just about anything that they can get in their mouth or in this case their bill. I have witnessed deer eating meat after a forest fire and I’ve watched cows eat cans and scrap metal of various kinds. Available call: 864-202-7561 or email: carter@boucherart.com

 

"Brahma Bull," 12" x 12" Linocut print. Available From the series of animals they did behind cages or fences.

“Brahma Bull,” 12″ x 12″ Linocut print. 
From the series of animals called “Fences and Cages”.

 

Digital StillCamera

“Apes” etching

Down By the Drinking Trough

Down by the Drinking Trough,”

Aquarelle Watercolors. Collection

of the Anderson Arts Center SOLD

 

Flyswatter transparent watercolors

“Flyswatter,” aquarelle watercolors SOLD

 

"Moses," 11"w x 14" h oil commission SOLD

“Moses,” 11″w x 14″ h oil commission SOLD

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